Wednesday, 3 February 2016

DELHI - JAMA MASJID

The Masjid-i Jahān-Numā (the 'World-reflecting Mosque'), commonly known as the Jama Masjid of Delhi, is one of the largest mosques in India. It was built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan between 1644 and 1656 at a cost of 1 million rupees, and was inaugurated by an imam from Bukhara, present-day Uzbekistan. The mosque was completed in 1656 AD with three great gates, four towers and two 40 m high minarets constructed of strips of red sandstone and white marble.

The courtyard can accommodate more than 25,000 persons. There are three domes on the terrace which are surrounded by the two minarets. On the floor, a total of 899 black borders are marked for worshippers. The architectural plan of Badshahi Masjid, built by Shah Jahan's son Aurangzeb at Lahore, Pakistan, is similar to the Jama Masjid.

It is unfortunate that the mosque has been the site of two attacks, one in 2006 and another in 2010. During the first, two explosions occurred in the mosque, injuring thirteen people. In the second, two Taiwanese students were injured as two gunmen opened fire upon them. Places of worship should be places of peace and good will, irrespective of creed or religious denomination...

This post is part of the Wednesday Waters meme,
and also part of the Waterworld Wednesday meme,
and also part of the Outdoor Wednesday meme,
and also part of the Wordless Wednesday meme,
and also part of the ABC Wednesday meme,
and also part of the Travel Tuesday meme.






8 comments:

  1. Beautiful Mosque and your photos are framed so well.

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  2. Absolutely fantastic place! Have a delightful week,

    Leslie
    abcw team

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  3. wonderful photo's ..... would like to visit that place !!


    Have a nice abc-day / - week
    ♫ M e l ☺ d u ♫ (abc-w-team)

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  4. Composition is perfect. Impressive Mosque. I would find it hard at my age to climb all those steps. Lovely photographs.
    JM, Illinois-U.S.A.

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  5. How beautiful!
    Thank you for sharing at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2016/02/abstractions.html

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I love to hear from you, so please comment. I appreciate constructive criticism as it improves my skills as an amateur photographer.